The College of New Jersey

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Course Descriptions

COUN 501 – INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING

The purposes of this course are to provide students with an orientation to the counseling profession and to teach students basic skills for counseling clients. The course begins with studies of the profession of counseling, including an overview of the history of counseling, professional counseling organizations and issues, major counseling specialties, requirements for counselor license and certification, multicultural considerations, and ethical and legal issues in counseling. The course includes a laboratory component in which students learn the stages of the counseling process and the skills and techniques of counseling.

COUN 515 – STATISTICS AND RESEARCH IN COUNSELING

Study of the organization, analysis, summarization, and interpretation of counseling data with special emphasis on developing research projects involving counseling data. The interrelationships among statistics, measurement, and research design are examined. Training in reading and interpreting counseling research literature is provided.

COUN 530 – MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to multicultural counseling which includes examining power and privilege to increase student awareness and understanding of, as well as their ability to competently counsel, individuals evidencing diversity in culture, race and ethnicity, family, nationality, language, age, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, religion and spirituality, and mental and physical abilities.

COUN 535 – CAREER COUNSELING AND PLACEMENT

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of career development and the role of the career counselor. The course is designed to examine theories of career development and decision making, sources of occupational information, and methods of career counseling, assessment and program planning. Both theory and the practical application of career counseling will be explored through lectures, class discussions, readings, writings and projects. Students will have the opportunity to practice various career counseling techniques and gain an understanding of their own career development. Ethical and legal issues, contemporary trends and application of career counseling models to a variety of populations in school and community settings will be explored.

COUN 551 – SUBSTANCE ABUSE & ADDICTION: INDIVIDUAL, FAMILY, & SOCIETY

The effects of alcohol and other chemicals on the body, as well as society, are presented. Societal attitudes and the reinforcement of drinking as it relates to the abuse of alcohol are examined. Medical aspects and diseases related to alcoholism, problem drinking, and chemical dependency are discussed. Alcohol and drug use, misuse and abuse as they affect individuals and society are stressed.

COUN 552 – SUBSTANCE ABUSE EDUCATION & PREVENTION

Strategies for educating the public about alcohol use, misuse, and abuse are presented. Various community agencies, including schools, are examined for their effectiveness in educating individuals and groups about alcohol and alcoholism and their effectiveness in the prevention of alcohol abuse. Educational principles, as well as methods and materials for educating individuals and groups of all ages, will be considered.

COUN 553 – TREATING SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS

The purpose of this course is to facilitate the learning of specific techniques for counseling individuals and their families who are affected by substance abuse, chemical dependency and co-occurring disorders. An emphasis will be placed on strategies for addressing the full spectrum of substance abuse problems, from problematic use to abuse to dependence and addiction, with specific attention given to increasing students’ sensitivity to the diverse needs of substance abusing individuals who suffer from co-occurring medical and psychiatric disorders. The development of competency in the professional treatment of substance use and co-occurring disorders is stressed.

COUN 670 – COUNSELING THEORY AND TECHNIQUES

The purposes of this course are to provide students with an understanding of the major theories of counseling and their related techniques and to apply theoretical material to case studies. Students will be exposed to an overview of current approaches to counseling, including psychodynamic, existential-humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, solution-focused and systems approaches. Emphasis is on both theory and practical applications of the various approaches. Through lectures, class discussions, readings, videos, writings, experiential exercises and role play situations, students will be encouraged to examine the various theories and to integrate them into their own style of counseling. This course includes a laboratory component in which students practice theory-based counseling strategies in role play scenarios.

COUN 675 – GROUP COUNSELING

Through didactic and experiential learning activities, this course provides an introduction to group counseling that enables students to explore the nature and function of various types of groups; basic principles of group dynamics; ethical, legal and professional issues; leadership and group development; member roles and functions; theoretical approaches to group counseling; how to design and lead groups across the human lifespan; and the nature and impact of their own interpersonal styles of behavior on their roles as both group members and group leaders.

CURR 514 – CURRICULUM THEORY & PRACTICE

The contemporary school curriculum from the primary through the secondary levels is examined, including social and educational foundations, basic factors in design, and common organizational patterns.

EDAD 525 – INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION

A comprehensive overview of the field of educational administration. An examination of the objectives, techniques, and materials of educational administration to assist the prospective school administrator in administrative leadership.

EDAD 530 – GROUP DYNAMICS FOR EDUCATIONAL LEADERS

This course is designed to study the intrapersonal and interpersonal skills essential for leaders to facilitate the development of cultures and climates which optimize success for all members of the school community. Topics include effective communication, team building, decision making, problem solving and the people side of change.

EDAD 540 – SCHOOL FINANCE

Students will explore the institutional basis and economics of finance. The course provides a comprehensive overview of the development, implementation, and evaluation of budgets, comparing funding sources in the public and educational sectors.

EDAD 572 – SCHOOL LAW

Students in this course study federal and state laws affecting the rights, privileges, and duties of administrators, teachers and ancillary personnel. Attention is given to the influence of government, finance, collective bargaining, and other pertinent school related factors.

EDAD 617 – ADVANCED SCHOOL LEADERSHIP: ADMINISTRATION/SUPERVISION

An analysis of the administrative process in theory and practice in contemporary schools. Topics will include: examination of leadership theory and styles; school organizations; administrative curriculum leadership; scheduling; facility management; school/community relations; contract administration; and service learning. Policies and practices will be examined in the context of knowledge and inquiry, best practice, multiculturalism diversity, inclusion, multiple context and communities, and leadership and advocacy.

EDAD 660 – COMPUTER APPS FOR EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATORS

This course includes an examination of the relationship and role of computer application to educational administration. Students will develop competencies in scheduling, attendance, grading systems, inventory, personnel records, and other administrative functions. Relevant research to be studied.

EDAD 691 – EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP I

The Educational Leadership Internship series consist of three 2 credit courses designed to expose students to the breadth, depth, and rigor of school administration.  The focus of the Fall Internship is on the responsibilities, tasks, and activities typically encountered by leaders in establishing a high performance learning culture.   Through field based experiences, students will learn how a leader emphasizes and reinforces the importance of teaching and learning goals that are consistent with school improvement plans.

EDAD 692 – EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP II

The Educational Leadership Internship series consist of three 2 credit courses designed to expose students to the breadth, depth, and rigor of school administration.  The focus of the Spring Internship is on the responsibilities, tasks, and activities to help the student gain self-confidence in administrative decision making as related to the use of data to maintain and establish a high performance learning culture.   Through field based experiences, students will learn how a leader prepares for standardized testing, professional development opportunities and brings closure on a school year.

EDAD 693 – EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP III

The Educational Leadership Internship series consist of three 2 credit courses designed to expose students to the breadth, depth, and rigor of school administration.  The focus of the Summer Internship is on the responsibilities, tasks, and activities typically encountered by leaders in preparation for beginning a school year.   Through field based experiences, students will learn how a leader readies the setting for a new school year.

EDAD 700 – EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

Every candidate for a graduate degree must take a comprehensive examination which requires the candidate to synthesize and apply knowledge acquired throughout the program.

EDFN 508 – INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH: DATA-BASED DECISION MAKING

This course examines basic research design, library and computer search strategies, and certain statistical concepts. Emphasis is on understanding and interpreting research studies.

EDFN 521 – CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION

This course will examine education as a cultural phenomenon and will focus upon culture, its relationship to language and school achievement, and the implications for teaching, learning, and counseling. There is an emphasis upon the multicultural curriculum, second language instruction, and critical pedagogy. This course fulfills the requirements for multicultural education.

EDUC 513 – COLLABORATION, CONSULTATION, & PARTNERSHIPS

This course is based on the premise that successful teachers are those who communicate effectively with other teachers in their schools, related services professionals in their district, parents of their students, and personnel in community agencies. Specific collaboration and team problem-solving skills are taught through the case method, role-playing, and field-based projects. Emphasized are family-centered, culturally sensitive practices and collaborative problem solving.

EDUC 614 – CREATING AND SUSTAINING CLASSROOM COMMUNITIES

Behavior issues are reported by new teachers to be one of the biggest challenges they encounter.  Current literature indicates that for many students,traditional reactive approaches are ineffective and may indeed exacerbate inappropriate behaviors over the long run.  The purpose of this course is to help future teachers develop a critical awareness of their classroom as a community and through this awareness develop strategies to proactively address behavioral challenges within this community.  The course encourages students to develop a position of inquiry towards behavior that is reflective, proactive, and non-aversive.  The course draws extensively on literature and best practices in areas such as constructivist approaches to classroom management, positive behavioral supports, person-centered planning, parent-professional collaboration, and social skills training.

ELEM 663 – ADVANCED TRENDS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Examination of current trends in elementary education through the critical analysis of recent research. Topics emphasized are: (1) innovations in school and classroom organization; (2) recent developments in curricula; (3) current trends in evaluation, measurement, and grouping; (4)implications of P.L. 94-142; and (5) competing viewpoints on current issues and practices in elementary education.

ELEM 694 – INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING AND PLANNING

Observation and limited teaching in a school classroom two full days a week for eight weeks under the guidance of a college supervisor. Weekly seminar meetings for one month prior to the classroom experience and a concluding seminar are required. Topics discussed include: aims and objectives of educational programs; lesson and unit planning; methods of teaching and styles of learning; school curriculum; classroom management; and assessment of student progress.

ELEM 695 – INTERNSHIP II IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

The Internship II experience will be a full semester.  The intern will gradually assume responsibility for planning, teaching, and directing the learning activities of the class culminating in a minimum of two weeks of full-time classroom teaching.  Each intern will be supervised by college supervisors and a cooperating teacher(s).

ELEM 696 – CULMINATING SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Designed to be the culminating seminar for all students in the MEd and MAT programs. The course requires students to articulate, demonstrate, and utilize the knowledge, skills, and dispositions indicative of the integration of previous graduate course work. Leadership and advocacy projects such as professional publications, curriculum audits, and other professional contributions are mandatory for successful completion of this course.

EPSY 523 – ADVANCED CHILD & ADOLESCENT GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT

An overview of the concepts and theories of child development with emphasis placed on the elementary-school aged child. Developmental issues are examined from sociocultural and educational perspectives.

EPSY 643 – MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the field of psychological and educational testing.  Students will become familiar with the basic principles of test construction, administration, scoring, and interpretation.  In addition, issues related to validity, reliability, testing in the multicultural context, and performance assessment will be examined. Commonly used tests of ability, aptitude, and personality will be reviewed. This coure requires a working knowledge of descriptive statistics.

EPSY 661 – COUNSELING CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

This course provides an overview of developmentally appropriate counseling approaches used for counseling children and adolescents, primarily in school settings. Examples of approaches discussed in this course include solution focused therapy, expressive techniques, play and impact therapy. Special education services, including legislation relevant to school counselors are discussed. The course also includes an examination of processes related to meeting the needs of underserved student populations.

ESLM 525 – SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

An overview of some of the major themes and issues in second language acquisition and how this impacts learning in an academic setting. Consideration will be given to topics such as research methodology, the role of the native language, morpheme acquisition orders, differential success, the linguistic environment, theories of second language acquisition, etc.

ESLM 545 – ENGLISH STRUCTURE & PROFICIENCY ASSESSMENT

This course is designed to develop students’ competency in the applied linguistics with a good understanding of English structure and its application in L2 learning and acquisition. It enables students to compare the structures of phonetics and grammar of English and L2 learners’ L1 to discover or identify the pitfalls and potential trouble spots in various areas of phonetics and grammar during L2 learners’ learning process and design appropriate and effective strategies for L2 learning and instruction. This course also provides students with language proficiency assessment standards, instruments, and strategies.

ESLM 577 – SOCIOLINGUISTICS & CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS OF ESL

This course provides an overview of topics in the sociolinguistics and cultural foundations of education as they relate to teaching English as a second language (ESL). Particular emphasis is given to the role and nature of culture in the educational context and the significance of cultural groups and cultural identity. We focus on what it means to engage in culturally responsive teaching and learning in mainstream and ESL classrooms. Among the topics explored are: speech communities, multilingualism, multiculturalism, language variation, race, gender, and cross-cultural communication. We consider those topics from the perspective of teaching linguistically and culturally diverse learners. The course also includes an introduction to Conversation Analysis (CA) and its connections to language pedagogy, pragmatics and foreign language acquisition.

ESLM 578 – THEORY/PRACTICE IN ESL

Designed to develop competency in the theoretical foundations of second language acquisition, an understanding of the unique aspects of the process of second language teaching, and the necessary practical application of those theories as required in the ESL classroom.

ESLM 579 – LANGUAGE & LITERACY FOR ESL

This course provides an overview of issues in language and literacy as they relate to the teaching of English as a second language.  Theories and models of first and second language reading processes are discussed, which provide a basis upon which to consider reading and literacy skills development and acquisition in the second language context.  among the topics that we address are: linguistic processing of text (i.e., phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic queuing in L1 and L2), strategies and meta-cognitive skills, content schema and background knowledge, vocabulary acquisition, reading and writing relationships, and theories and issues in second language reading.

ESLM 587 – CURRICULUM METHODS FOR MULTILINGUAL POPULATIONS

This course is designed to develop competence in the application of the theoretical foundations of second language learning and acquisition and bilingual education in teaching multilingual populations. It enables candidates to practice ESL and/or bilingual methodologies, to design and implement appropriate instructional strategies and activities, to develop curricula and select material, and to perform proper evaluation procedures for ESL and bilingual programs respectively.

ESLM 688 – TESL STUDENT TEACHING PRACTICUM

On-site experiences arranged for students in government and related institutions and agencies in the community. Covers a 14-week period arranged to fit the schedule of the participating student.

ESLM 700 – TESL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

Every candidate for a graduate degree must take a comprehensive examination which requires the candidate to synthesize and apply knowledge acquired throughout the program.

RDLG 579 – CONTENT AREA LITERACY

A study of the purposes, specialized reading skills, reading materials, modes of inquiry specific to the content areas, and application of these specialized skills to the specific reading task.

REGS 999 – ELEMENTARY/SECONDARY EDUCATION COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

Every candidate for a graduate degree must take a comprehensive examination which requires the candidate to synthesize and apply knowledge acquired throughout the program.

SCED 663 – ADVANCED TRENDS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

Examination of current trends in secondary education through the critical analysis of recent research. Topics emphasized are: (1) innovations in school and classroom organization; (2) recent developments in curricula; (3) current trends in evaluation, measurement, and grouping; (4) implications of P.L.94-142; and (5) competing viewpoints on current issues and practices in secondary education.

SCED 694 – INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING AND PLANNING

A pre-student-teaching experience in which students meet weekly for presentations, discussions, and in-class peer lessons. Topics include long- and short-term planning, classroom management, and student evaluation. Some off-campus field work will be required.

SCED 695 – INTERNSHIP II IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

Full-time teaching for 13 weeks under the supervision of a cooperating teacher in a secondary school.  Payment of student-teaching fee must accompany tuition and fees at time of registration.  A student may take no more than six credits while doing intern teaching.  A student must be matriculated into a graduate program and within nine credits of completing the requirements for the master’s degree in order to be admitted to student teaching.  Students may elect one of the following three plans: Plan A: On-the-job teaching supervised for one semester by members of The College staff. Plan B: Student teaching for 13 weeks under the supervision of a certified cooperating teacher. Plan C: Student teaching in an accredited evening high school under the supervision of a certified teacher for two consecutive semesters.

SCED 696 – CULMINATING SEMINAR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

Designed to be the culminating seminar for all students in the MEd and MAT programs. The course requires students to articulate, demonstrate, and utilize the knowledge, skills, and dispositions indicative of the integration of previous graduate course work. Leadership and advocacy projects such as professional publications, curriculum audits, and other professional contributions are mandatory for successful completion of this course.

SPED 501 – STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN OUR SCHOOLS

An introduction to the field of special education, focusing on the characteristics and educational needs of students with disabilities. The course covers etiology and behavioral manifestations of a wide variety of disabling conditions and introduces current approaches to the education of students with these disabilities. Included is up-to-date information on federal and state laws that affect programs for children with disabilities and key issues in special education today.

SPED 521 – ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

A course about technology applications that benefit children and youth with disabilities.  This course focuses on teaching students the skills they will need to use assistive technology appropriately and effectively with children and youth with disabilities.  Emphasis is placed on establishing skills in the areas of making computers accessible, using the Internet to find assistive technology resources, customizing adaptive devices, and facilitating augmentative communication with computers.

SPED 522 – REMEDIAL INSTRUCTION

This course provides students with the skills necessary to conduct functional and standardized classroom assessments of pupils with reading and writing disabilities; to develop instructional plans based upon the results of their assessments; and to choose and implement appropriate specialized approaches as well as strategies to address the learning difficulties identified.

SPED 522 – REMEDIAL INSTRUCTION

This course provides students with the skills necessary to conduct functional and standardized classroom assessments of pupils with reading and writing disabilities; to develop instructional plans based upon the results of their assessments; and to choose and implement appropriate specialized approaches as well as strategies to address the learning difficulties identified.

SPED 614 – CREATING AND SUSTAINING CLASSROOM COMMUNITIES

Behavior issues are reported by new teachers to be one of the biggest challenges they encounter.  Current literature indicates that for many students,traditional reactive approaches are ineffective and may indeed exacerbate inappropriate behaviors over the long run.  The purpose of this course is to help future teachers develop a critical awareness of their classroom as a community and through this awareness develop strategies to proactively address behavioral challenges within this community.  The course encourages students to develop a position of inquiry towards behavior that is reflective, proactive, and non-aversive.  The course draws extensively on literature and best practices in areas such as constructivist approaches to classroom management, positive behavioral supports, person-centered planning, parent-professional collaboration, and social skills training.

SPED 617 – PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

This course is a practicum in which students will have an opportunity to observe children with disabilities in special education and general settings.  Students are expected to spend at least 20 hours a week for the duration of a semester in a public school classroom with at least 3 students with IEPs.  Based on their observations and field experiences, students complete a series of written assignments which relate to models of service delivery in special education, role of related service personnel, IEP development, lesson design, differentiation of instruction,  delivery of instruction, analysis of student learning, and reflection.  A seminar is an integral part of this experience.

SPED 624 – ADVANCED STUDY IN LEARNING DISABILITIES

An intensive overview of the field of learning disabilities: definition, characteristics, assessment, subtypes of, and major educational approaches for teaching.  Current research in both cognition and brain physiology will be explored.

SPED 626 – TEACHING STUDENTS WITH SEVERE DISABILITIES

An advanced course about teaching students with moderate to severe mental retardation and other severe disabilities, this course focuses on meeting the special needs of this low-incidence population.  Emphasis is placed on current philosophies and services such as preparing students to live and work in the community, self-advocacy, family-centered practices, appropriate applications of assistive technology, and designing functional curriculum plans.

SPED 647 – SIGNIFICANT DISORDERS

This course focuses on preparing teachers to understand the early communication development of children with severe disabilities and its educational program implications. Students will develop skills in the analysis of communication  development in children who have social, cognitive, motor, and sensory impairments, as well as the application of  appropriate augmentative communication systems. There will be an emphasis on assessment of expressive/receptive  communication skills (nonsymbolic–symbolic); teaching communication as an access skill across the curriculum; using  augmentative communication to access the New Jersey core curriculum content standards; natural and assistive  technology supports for communication (augmentative/alternative communication); and measuring skills of  interaction/communication in students.

SPED 648 – POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORT

This course specifically focuses on addressing the needs of students who demonstrate extremely challenging behaviors and are at a high risk of being excluded from inclusive school and community settings. What are the varied challenges faced by these students and their families? How should the positive behavior supports inquiry process be guided for  such students? What can we learn from the perspectives of consumers who are navigating these challenges? What  strategies should we use to mobilize school and community support for such students? What are the pros and cons of   medication? What kinds of quality-of-life issues need to be addressed in order to bring about a long-term impact on  behavior? These are some of the questions that will be addressed throughout this course. The intent of this course is to  provide students with the necessary skills that will enable them to support such students and advocate for them within the system. The emphasis of the course is on collaboration, inclusion, and non-aversive techniques.

SPED 664 – RESEARCH IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

In-depth study of methods of comparative analysis and research models in current studies relevant to the theoretical and practical issues in the education of children with learning and behavior disabilities.  Emphasis on interdisciplinary contexts; action research by practitioners; collaborative models; and the cultural, developmental, and social bases for learning and behavior.

SPED 672 – TEACHING STUDENTS WHO ARE BLIND

This course will provide entry-level skill development for planning interventions based on individual assessment of learning needs. The course will examine educational needs of both tactual and visual learners at various levels of development: infancy and early childhood; school years; transition to college/work. The expanded core curriculum (ECC) for B/VI learners will be examined, and determination of how it can best be woven into the core curriculum for all learners will be discussed. Included in the ECC is the reinforcement of supporting students’ orientation and mobility, and basic skills of negotiating indoor and outdoor environments.

SPED 675 – RESEARCH ON BLINDNESS

This course introduces students to the historical and philosophical foundations of blindness and visual impairments. Based on a current examination of the research and literature in this area, this course identifies contemporary issues in the education of students who are blind/visually impaired (BVI), including those with multiple disabilities. Contemporary issues will include current educational definitions, identification criteria, educational placement options as well as instructional options for students who are blind/visually impaired. The psychosocial factors that impact the dynamic interaction between individuals who are blind/visually impaired and those who are normally sighted will be addressed within the context of current research and evidence-based practices in education. Students will examine the research on the impact of blindness, whether total or partial, on all developmental levels, including infancy, early childhood, later childhood, adolescence, and transition to post-school settings.

SPED 700 – SPECIAL EDUCATION COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

Every candidate for a graduate degree must take a comprehensive examination which requires the candidate to synthesize and apply knowledge acquired throughout the program.

SUPV 520 – STAFF SUPERVISION

A study of the objectives, techniques, and materials of staff supervision. Examination of the supervisory function toward improvement of instruction. The nature of contemporary supervision, interpersonal relations, and the supervisor as an agent of change.

VCPD 530 – FOUNDATIONS OF LITERACY ONLINE (PLS)

This course explores the components of early reading instruction defined by the National Reading Panel and the International Reading Association. Students will build a knowledge base for each component and then apply that knowledge within a classroom setting. Several modules will include brief discussions on compatible informal assessments. Students will construct a portfolio of teaching strategies for each component. At the end of the course, students will construct a final capstone lesson plan which will incorporate each early reading component for use in the classroom.

VCPD 590 – SECONDARY CONTENT METHODS ONLINE (PLS)

Examine the core curriculum content standards in New Jersey secondary schools to help students make connections among the higher level courses they have taken in college and the material taught in secondary schools. The course has a common core in which learners study methods that enable them to meet the needs of all of the learners in their diverse classrooms, and has assignments and requirements in which the students study the methods and approaches specific to their own disciplines.

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